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for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
in europe, that still, you know, is simmering beneath the surface. >> rose: we conclude this evening with matt damon and john krakinski, two of the actors in gus van sant's new movie, "promised land". >> the biggest conversation matt and i can have is it starts conversation, beyond the issue of grabbing in the vernacular right now, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie
slowly than they would like to, if at all. europe is basically flat, the u.s. is improving, but it is not exactly galloping and, you know, we are entering probably a weak quarter where people are hoping it will be stronger over the course of the year, china is slowing some and in general all of the emerging markets are slower than they were most of them india has slowed dramatically, brazil is slow, so yes, indeed it is a fragile situation, when the u.s. is one of the bright spots, you know, eking out make two percent growth, one percent growth this quarter you know things aren't very good. >> rose: do you expect to see, speaking of the united states, growth rate getting back close to four percent? >> well, you know, it is in the realm of possibility, but i think the trend growth rate, you know, is going to be more on the order of two and a half and i mean some days some quarters it will be worse than that, some quarters it will be better than that. there are many private forecasters calling for it to be three percent by years end, i think we are doing pretty well if that h
to allow the world to pass them by or be bound by the confines of a weak europe including germany appears to be on the brink of recession. the last quarter was fabulous, best in its history. stocks a half a point off its high. terrific 51% gain since i got behind it on august of 2011. it's not done. i think it has room to run. let's check in with bill mcdermott, the ceo of s.a.p. welcome back to "mad money." >> good to see you, jim. >> best third quarter in history. >> yes. >> how is it possible? >> we're focused on the nexus of force as you mentioned. when we put the strategy of the company together we were determined to double the addressable market. where's the world going? it's going mobile. do you know anyone that doesn't have a mobile device? >> no. and i don't want anything else frankly. >> exactly. there's more mobile devices in the world than toothbrushes. that was good enough for us to focus on mobile. >> are you still the largest buyer of some mobile devices? >> yes, we are. i don't know if we're the largest, but we're up there. we have done a lot of work with apple no doubt ab
on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were foun
are you able to do so well in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25
't talk enough about it. and i've got to tell you, that's got to change in 2013. then there's europe. today, just today, i am wearing a tie that commemorates a brilliant strategy. one which works so amazingly that i'm still dazzled by it. what's happening on this tie? it's a man, a man in a suit kicking a can down the road. you see while the europeans were kicking the can, they gave themselves times to develop a plan to allow governments and banks to raise capital and fix the respective balance sheets at lower levels than anyone thought possible. coming into the year, you know what my number one worry was? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of bank backstop that did work. the europeans realized if they stopped
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the bountiful energy found in america, all of the natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to building and fixing up homes in 2013 than ther
's talk about europe. you mentioned emerging markets, but have you a big exposure to europe. stock markets going up, but no economic activity to speak of. is that where the economic activity not picking up yet for you guys either? >> yeah, when you look at last season, the last lawn and garden season, it was down somewhere in the neighborhood of about 15% of the the market overall, and that was really reflective, obviously of decreased consumer spending and people feeling a lot of the impacts of macroeconomic conditions in europe. as we look forward, into europe, into this next season, we're calling it flat, simply because there are is so much uncertainty going on over there with how they solve their economic problems. at the same time, geographic diversification is really important for us, especially in the emerging markets. last week, friday, we closed on a deal down in brazil, one of the key markets we look at from an emerging market standpoint, a company by the name of bronco, which does a lot of high-end equipment, commercial type equipment for the brazilian market and we think that w
of uncertainty. so you have china engineering a soft landing and starting to recover. you have europe away from the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be sign
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
-quality problem, turning around europe, taking india by storm, talking about adding thousands upon thousands of stores throughout china, even showed you numbers that said unlike yum, kentucky fried chicken, hasn't seen any deceleration in china. these are my ears like i listen, i've watched. howard schultz, call me crazy, investing with them, my bad. and then i heard the questions from the audience, i didn't even listen. what were they looking at versus what i was looking at. they were looking at john carter, i was looking at the new bond movie. one after another, they were all down beat. is the expansion too rapid? whether demand for expensive coffee is there. i was waiting for a guy to say, listen, that triple cappuccino it stinks. if i were howard, i would tell them to take a hike. they were too negative versus what the company's up to. opportunity. starbucks was actually down. one time -- i have the apple ipad, you know, thing i'm like, wow, it's under 50. i mean, wow. terrific opportunity. ipad, i mentioned it, surprised one didn't come down and hit me over the head and knock me out. ap
kinds of europe stuff. all anybody wants is fiscal cliff resolution. >> did the fed spook anybody yesterday? >> no, i don't think so. i really think what sold off yesterday is people were just concerned about the fiscal cliff again. the fed didn't really do anything. they put kindleing on the fire, if we get a fiscal cliff, there's an awful lot of money out there to get this market going. >> it just strikes me that a central bank now $85 billion new dollars per month into the financial system and buying treasuries to hold rates down, they're not going to let rates go up any. i just intuit that. >> no. there was some talk that perhaps what they signaled was higher rates sooner than 2015 and i think that's absolutely wrong. there's no way. this was an easing policy. they're putting more money into the system. they're not going to let rates go up any sooner than they need to. after most recession, they don't really raise rates until 18 months after. so i think 2017 is probably your number. >> 2017. all right. let me just ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doi
is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is very import
means i.c.e. will be clearing its equity trades in europe. this deal will not face regulatory scrutiny with the way that this is formed. the former deal attempts with deutsche boerse fell and here there was no overlap between i.c.e. and nyc. however, this clearing agreement makes it very tough and expensive to break up this deal between nyc and i.c.e., so the question market sources are asking now is what is the next move for cme group, nasdaq, hong kong exchange, among others? let's talk about when,deal and what it all means right now. scott, this is part of the deal that's really being underreported and not spoken about too much. that's the clearing exchange partnership. that's going to make it very tough to penetrate and to get any competitors to break up this deal. >> officials all over the globe who are assessing this deal and trying to figure out what they are going to do next to try to remain competitive. joining us now are david faber, bob pisani and steven guilfoyle and rick santelli at the cme. first, david, who broke the story this morning, i guess this deal had to happen ba
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent data out of europe, we will talk about in a minute what a day for the asian markets again. also coming up. our road map begins at andrews air force base where the president arrives in a couple of hours, cutting his hawaiian vacation short to address the fiscal cliff s there really any hope in the last attempt? does the market fade if there's no news tomorrow night? >> the nikkei continues its 21-month run. how much is the boj willing to put up with? >> looking a at potential strike in the nation's port on the east and southern coast, the first since '77 that could cost retailers and importers billions. businesses now asking its white house to get involved. >>> you can now get the nokia lumia for free, depending on the service provider contract you sign s that standard practice or a sign the company's flagship phone suspect selling well? >>> we will start off with news about the fiscal cliff. congress returning to capitol hill today to try to get a deal done on the cliff before the deadline on december 31st. senate majority leader harry rei
fitness award, it ain't going to happen unless i am living in europe when there is precedent when the entire european union accepts the nobel peace prize. i am serious, they are serious, the same folks who brought you riots they could not stop and protests they could not control, and now they are winning a nobel peace prize that has to be unbelievable for a union that is going off the we rails and a currency that threatens to go off the abyss to former u.k. member of parliament john brown who is going out of his mind. i cannot believe this, but, yet, when i first heard it announced, it really happened. >> yes, you are absolutely right. when i was a nato soldier myself and when i was a member of parliament i was on the political arm of nato which was the north atlantic assembly and it was clear that it was nato particularly with the american and british nuclear deterrence that kept the peace and that extended through a circle around the ussr and margaret thanker made me the escort for gorbachev and it was clear that president reagan's strategic defense initiative brought them to th
that as a problem states are operating as individual countries. when you go to europe, you know, the size is around the same but you see each state size is a country in europe. we are operating like a country. each state if colorado wants marijuana then they goat et it. if florida wants to have guns. was i was growing up i noticed that the federal government stepped in more. the lawmakers were accountable. if you went too mar in yofar in state the federal government slapped you back a little bit. when president obama came into arizona he got a stern talking to. and he's a chief of the country and he has a finger in his face. we have to have the respect for our leaders. the best that we can do is get t the stand your ground laurie peeled. that is why we want to repeal that. >> lucia and ron and your lawyer, john phillips. thank you for coming here and telling the story. i'm very, very sorry that you are sitting here tonight telling the story that you have to tell. thank you. we'll be back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop
despite china and other emerging rising markets and that has been clear the past two years, where europe is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly continue to monitor. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for coming on the practical. have we have good news for the in you year. thank you very much. >> you as well. thank you. >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the stock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measur
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude
right now at where things stand in europe, you'll see that the ftse is barely higher. but you do see a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united sta
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
of europe and partly because of this fiscal cliff. i also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the president believes he has higher ground under this. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public opinion on their side. if you talk to people in washington there is a sense that a
off in europe it's made its way over here. how many times have we tossed away that broken coffee machine and bought a new one. inspiring others fix those broken household items. >> everything old is new again at the west seattle fix it collector. >> a group of that's like to get together and help each other fix whatever we own. >> from sewing machines to fans to lawn mowers, if it is broke they will try to fix it repair groups have flourished in europe and spreading to the united states. >> i like the idea of reusing something that has already had a life, already been built and created most of its environmental foot prints. >> members of the fix it collectors in brooklyn help people save the planet and a buck or two. >> throw away culture motivates a lot of us to come here and try to fight it. the economy definitely played a role. minute it breaks or the newest gadget comes out they have to get the new one and throw the old one away. it's expensive and what are we doing to the planet. >> so big in europe they attract up to half a million dollars in grants. not so here in the unit
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
around the globe, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
? >> separately. keith lives in the united states and i live in europe. >> one of the great clips i came across was you guys noodling together. >> yeah. >> how much of that is the secret sauce of the stones, where you two need to be together to do that? >> i think we've gone past that, really. >> we're made to do this. it's when we're not working there's a problem. or could be. but otherwise, mick and i have been working together the last few months. it's been a revelation really. >> really? >> yeah. how you can all get along once you're in the groove and stuff and how much we actually do fit together. it's very interesting. >> there was a time earlier this year, i thought -- i don't think it will happen again. i didn't mind. >> there was a time when it was in the balance when people were saying oh, it's not going to happen. it looked like it, but i never believed it. >> and as they had struggled for harmony, some in the band have also tackled addiction over the years, most notably keith's hard-won battles with heroin. >> i don't do anything no more. i've done it all. once you've done it all, w
think there is a lot of optimism - even in europe there's a lot of optimism, but we know how that all goes when there is a lot of optimism. so, anyway, slow trading expected this week. > will there be some last- minute adjustments, or have most of those folks already gone home and closed the books for the year? > > i think for the most part anyone that really had anything to do really has done it already. that would be the capital gains tax-type selling, that sort of thing. but there's always some minor window dressing issues that could come up. so i wouldn't really pay much attention to the price action this week. what is probably more important is the first couple weeks in january. > do you have any kind of end- of-the-year strategy here, or are you just kind of going sit on your hands? > > at this point, no. just wait 'til next year and start fresh. > no plan is a good plan. it's good to have you on the show this morning. take care. > > thanks angela. in our cover story, workers making the minimum will make a little more in ten states beginning january first. and each of those incr
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not because of a lack evidence but because it would put the future of the largest banks at risk. think of that. not because they didn't have the goods. they were worried about the banking system. this says clearly it
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